Marrow is maybe a once or twice a year indulgence, and the bones we had at Packing House were about as good as we can remember having. They were also presented in a way that seems be almost impossible to have at home unless you have a clean band saw or some other way of cutting through the bone…or a butcher like the Savino brothers at Blue Ribbon Meat Market.

When I was a kid growing up in Portage Park, and we’d have a steak with a bone, my mom and I would use a knife to get every last scrap of marrow out of the bone. We smeared it on bread with salt, very basic and delicious.

Last Saturday night at Packing House, we ordered the Marrow Bones, and were thrilled to see three hefty bones, neatly cut lengthwise, brimming with delicious marrow.

Marrow is neither a low calorie snack nor even a highly nutritious snack: per ounce, marrow packs about 250 calories and a negligible amount of protein (less than one gram in one ounce).

Still, marrow is maybe a once or twice a year indulgence, and the bones we had at Packing House were about as good as we can remember having.

If the bones are not cut, you need to scoop out the marrow with a special spoon. I prefer the bones cut longitudinally (to better access the marrow) and the Savino brothers at Blue Ribbon Meat Market will do that cut for you.

When I asked Russ Savino if he had any marrow bones, I had to laugh when he responded, “Is this for your dog or you?”

These marrow bones are, indeed, fit for human or canine consumption. Savino says they’re just right for dogs because “the femur is a good, hard bone,” so dogs can chew them without them splintering. If you have a dog, I’d recommend eating the marrow yourself and giving the bone to your pooch, who I’m sure would appreciate it with or without the marrow.

The bones are also cheap: about two bucks or a little less per pound. And Savino will even do the somewhat difficult lengthwise cut for you.

As we said, marrow bones are probably not the kind of thing you’d want to eat more than twice or so a year…though marrow is fabulously delicious.

Join the discussion on social media!

David Hammond

David Hammond, a corporate communications consultant and food journalist living in Oak Park, Illinois, is a founder and moderator of LTHForum.com, the 8,500 member Chicago-based culinary chat site. David...

6 replies on “Marrow Bones. Not Just for Dogs.”