Park District of Oak Park moving forward with pool planning

New amenities, programs considered for Rehm, Ridgeland Common

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Print

By Marty Farmer

Sports Editor

The Park District of Oak Park is waiting for word on whether it will receive state grant funds for upgrades at Rehm Park Pool. Meanwhile, plans are moving forward on the future of both Rehm and the newly redone Ridgeland Common Pool, said park district officials at a public meeting on April 23 at Cheney Mansion.

The park district, along with consultants from Nagle Hartray Architecture and Water Technology Inc., hosted the second of three meetings to discuss the aquatics master plan and listen to comments from residents regarding both pools.

"I think the meeting went well," said Diane Stanke, the park district's director of marketing and customer service. "It was a more traditional approach, which I think created a good atmosphere for dialogue. Resident feedback is important and survey responses are steadily being returned [since the April 23 meeting]. Currently there have been over 50 responses. Additionally, we will be placing the design boards at the GRC [Gymnastics Recreation Center] to allow more residents to view and provide comment."

Leading into the meeting, the park district collected 491 online survey results (93 percent from Oak Parkers), which included a variety of questions about the pools and how to develop their optimum use. Sixty-three percent of respondents would like additional shade structures at both pools, while added pool amenities like a water flume slide, interactive spray pad, lazy river and climbing wall were the most popular choices among several options, which could potentially be added to either Rehm or Ridgeland Common.

Rehm Pool consists of three areas: a diving well, the main pool and a kids' play area. The kids' play area, which includes a zero-depth pool with play features, a wading pool and sandbox, is the portion of Rehm where much of the grant money (if received) would be allocated for upgrades. Matt Freeby, the project manager from Water Technology Inc., presented several pool amenity options, ranging from assorted slides, waterways and games for both the diving well and main pool areas in four layout designs for residents to consider.

Upgrades for Ridgeland Common are more program-based. Eric Penney, a principal of Nagle Hartray, mentioned during the meeting that the pool at Ridgeland Common (which should last 20 years) is being painted, cracks have been patched, and the gutter, deck and mechanicals have all been redone.

The possibility of an indoor pool, which some residents supported, in the first aquatics master plan meeting, dominated the final portion of the April 23 gathering.

Currently, Rehm Pool and Ridgeland Common Pool generate funds that are used toward capital projects throughout the park district. Based on research, indoor pools typically don't cover all of their operating costs. Indoor pools which typically have the best outlook for financial success tend to include an activity pool for kids' play, a lap swim pool, therapy and lessons in the pool and are housed within a community recreation center or fitness facility.

In Oak Park, however, creation of an indoor pool could potentially reduce funds for the park district to allocate towards its capital improvement plan.

Per Nagle Hartray's research, projections for the cost of having a permanent indoor pool at Ridgeland Common are $13-16 million (plus operating costs) and $16-19 million at Rehm (plus operating costs). The estimated cost of a building a new indoor facility would fall in the range of $35-40 million (plus operating costs).

The park district has posted a second pool master plan survey to collect additional feedback from residents on its website (pdop.org). The second pool master plan survey can be found in the featured news section on the home page.

"The long-term purpose of these meeting is to create a comprehensive pools master plan," said Jan Arnold, executive director of the park district. "We will have another meeting in June and then another survey. We value input from our residents as a critical component in order to best serve the community."

Rehm Pool opens on Saturday, May 24 and Ridgeland Common on Saturday, June 14.

Contact:
Email: marty@oakpark.com Twitter: @OakParkSports

Reader Comments

4 Comments - Add Your Comment

Comment Policy

to Peter  

Posted: April 30th, 2014 12:21 PM

What do you consider "outside of school hours?" Can the pd run swim classes their at night on weekends?what happens when theirs a holiday, or the HS decides it wants to earn money off of swim programs? So the HS get the pool 6am to 6pm and pd gets it 6pm to 6am? doesn't seem all that much of sharing too me. I remember when the pd used to run lap swimming at the hs. They hs was always closed at the last minute, etc.

Peter Traczyk  

Posted: April 30th, 2014 9:37 AM

OPRFHS recently announced a plan to study an option of locating a new pool building on the vacated block of 100 S. Scoville. I strongly encourage D200, the Village, and the Parks Dept to consider this option seriously. It might be a perfect opportunity for the Parks Dept to engage in an intergovernmental agreement with D200 to manage the pool outside of school hours. That might not be the perfect indoor solution for the Oak Park aquatics community, but I think it's a very viable compromise solution that engages our taxing bodies in sharing resources and engaging in common planning.

Former staffer  

Posted: April 30th, 2014 9:13 AM

1. Because there is no way they can share 1 pool. Both would need about 70% usage. 2. Who fixes it when broken, staffs it, etc. While it might sound like a good idea, in theory it would never work.

Brian from Oak Park  

Posted: April 29th, 2014 4:44 PM

Can someone explain why OPRFHS and the Park District are not on the same page? Two indoor pools?

Quick Links

Sign-up to get the latest news updates for Oak Park and River Forest.


            
SubscribeClassifieds
Photo storeContact us
Submit Letter To The Editor