Failed referendum will hit middle schools hardest

Opinion: Letters To The Editor

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I am writing in support of the pending referendum. While no one wants to pay more taxes, I believe we would be shortsighted if we did not consider what our elementary schools and middle schools will look like if the referendum does not pass.

Like many Oak Park families, we moved here from Chicago seven years ago for the public schools and for the vibrant, diverse community. We have had three children go through the District 97 schools. I believe that the middle schools will suffer the most if this referendum does not pass. Middle school, as we all know, is a difficult time for our children. It is a time when we need to "hook" them into learning and into a positive community in any way that we can. Among the programs at risk for being cut are the arts and sports. These programs enrich their lives and make them want to come to school. Not all parents in Oak Park can afford to privately provide these experiences for their children.

My own kids were exposed to the arts through BRAVO — orchestra, band, ensemble choir and the theater program. I cannot emphasize enough what a positive effect this program has had on their development as young people. Because of people like Tina Reynolds, artistic director of BRAVO, whose charismatic leadership draws a talent pool around her that is deep and wide — people who want to work with her to make a difference in the lives of 11-, 12- and 13-year-olds; because of her, my kids had the chance to learn how to sing, dance and perform. More importantly, they learned how to cooperate, work together and respect each other. They learned how important a commitment is and what it means to work hard. They have experienced the highs of success through these programs, and also learned that they will live through disappointments. They learned what it means to want something really bad and to work for that, what it means to go on a "business trip" to Atlanta and represent your school in the theater fest and have others want to do what your school is doing. They have had the chance to learn from the best and then to lead the younger students. They have benefited from BRAVO's model of students learning from each other, as well as from adults. These are the things we want for all our youth — this is something that is hard to put a price on.

The school district has been working hard to make things right at the middle schools. They have been working to recruit the right teachers and other adults who work with these children. Things are working right now at Brooks. Many children are getting a good education in the classroom that is enriched by the programs outside of the classroom. Yes, some kids will still be able to play sports, take music lessons and participate in theater outside of school. These programs at risk of being cut are more than those isolated experiences. They are experiences that the school provides to educate the whole child. And they are more than just experiences — they are the direct result of the people who lead the efforts now in school — those whose jobs are on the line. It will be all our loss if the programs do not continue to have the positive impact on the hundreds of children that they are now.

I hope you will join me in voting yes for the referendum.

Karen Crowley
Oak Park

Reader Comments

3 Comments - Add Your Comment

Comment Policy

Alan Reed from Oak Park, Illinois  

Posted: April 1st, 2011 3:43 PM

@Interested P: Yes, I've heard the rationale. But faced with a tough choice, some might have preferred to increase class size rather than cut the arts. In addition (and you can call me cynical) but it would also have robbed the "Yes on Ref" campaign of a valuable talking point and rallying cry. Btw, I still see other districts keeping arts, but spending less per student overall...it shows me that there are likely other choices that could be (or could have been) made. Tough choices indeed...

Interested P  

Posted: April 1st, 2011 3:29 PM

Alan, they have given the reason over and over. The cuts are intended to avoid raising class size tremendously and hitting the core academic classes. All of the cuts proposed, while painful if enacted, deal with the last few things left outside of the regular academic classroom. No one wants art or after school programs gone, but no one wants class sizes of 30 or more in academic classes in K-5, or 35 and up in MS classes, either. Tough choices....

Alan Reed from Oak Park, Illinois  

Posted: April 1st, 2011 3:18 PM

Karen: Few doubt the power and importance of these programs, especially at the critical Middle School ages. Please keep in mind that it is your own D97 Board and Administration that put these programs on the list of those to be cut in the event of a failed referendum. I support strong schools and merely believe that they can be achieved with the current ~$80million per year budget. Ask your Board and Admin why THEY want to cut these programs. They owe you the answer.

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