Smoke-free Oak Park?

Breathing smoke-free air is not a 'right'

Opinion

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By Donald Greg

I don't understand the article, or is it a subtle advertisement, "Group working to snuff out public smoking in Oak Park" in the Nov. 17 issue of WEDNESDAY JOURNAL. The one by Bill Dwyer, or is it by Mark Peysakhovick, advocacy director of the Illinois Heart Association. To me it reads like an advertisement, and as such contains normal ad puffery, deception, and unsupported claims. Especially the ending statement: "The right to breathe clean air."

I'm not well versed on constitutional law, civics, or Bills-of-Rights, but I've never heard of this right. In fact, it appears that America is moving in entirely the opposite direction from the rest of the world on this issue/right.

My mother who is 95, and in perfect health, has been around second-hand smoke. Likewise, for her 102-year-old sister. Perhaps her secret to avoiding the deadly effect of secondhand smoke was that she was too poor to eat in restaurants, party in bars and taverns, play in bowling alleys, or in a variety of other work areas. Funny, the article skirts the issue of restaurants and focuses on the "significant selling tools" for attracting more shoppers, workers, cars, and kids to Oak Park.

Do we really need more cars? More workers for non-existent jobs? More shoppers for limited goods and merchandise? And the most ludicrous of all?#34;busloads of kids to play in a not too kid-friendly village's limited out door play spaces.

Whatever happened to the concepts behind the words: options, balance, supply and demand, and marketplace forces?

Perhaps, Peysakhovick's assault on smokers, and restaurants that carter to them. should be redirected toward the food we all eat with pesticides, PCBs, and other hidden toxins. Or he could eat at home more often! But, I wonder, if this do-gooder's crusade against smoking in restaurants is more about a paycheck?

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