End of a meeting: Rep. Lilly takes offense

Asked to be a moral leader, thought her morals had been questioned

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Print

By Jim Bowman

Writer

Sen. Harmon, Rep. Lilly, Galewood town hall, September, 2013. The alderman had sat down after declining to comment on the questions and complaints which she had just heard from her constituents over the past hour of the meeting which she had not called.

As the meeting drew to a close, a woman called for Lilly and Harmon to "be a moral voice" in their roles as public officials.

Something in her voice set Lilly off. "My morals cannot be questioned," she responded, as the woman protested that she had been misunderstood. Lilly ignored her. "You are talking about me as an individual," she said, reaching her highest state of indignation yet.

The meeting ended a few minutes later. Lilly thanked all for coming, adding as a pledge of continuing interest, "I want you to contact me."

She did not say how to do this, but people could look it up. I did after the Franklin Park meeting in July and tried to contact her, as I said earlier. Got no answer.

Harmon closed with thanks of his own.

More to come, from Illinois Blues: How the Ruling Party Talks to Voters— available in paperbackepub and Amazon Kindle formats.

Contact:
Email: jimbowman7@aol.com Twitter: @BlitheSp

Reader Comments

No Comments - Add Your Comment

Note: This page requires you to login with Facebook to comment.

Comment Policy

Facebook Connect

Answer Book 2018

To view the full print edition of the Wednesday Journal 2018 Answer Book, please click here.

Quick Links

Sign-up to get the latest news updates for Oak Park and River Forest.


            
SubscribeClassified
MultimediaContact us
Submit Letter To The Editor
Place a Classified Ad

Latest Comments